Financial Education

Why Good Credit Matters

You probably already know how important your credit score is to lenders. When you apply for credit, your credit score helps lenders determine whether or not you are able to repay the loan based on your past financial performance. With a higher score, you qualify for better interest rates, lower payments, higher credit limits, and more types of credit than you would with a lower score.

Did you also know that your credit score can make it easier to rent an apartment, qualify for a good cell phone plan, and pay less for insurance? A higher score can save you hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars every year, which can add up to significant savings.

Not only can it hurt you financially, but many employers now check a potential employee's credit as part of the hiring decision. A low credit score could cost you a chance at your dream job.

How to Manage Credit to Improve Your Score

There are no tricks or quick fixes to getting a good score. However, you can raise your score over time by demonstrating that you consistently manage your credit responsibly. Here are 10 things you can do to improve your credit score:

  1. Pay your bills on time. Building a history of paying your bills on time will improve your score. Even if you've had serious delinquencies in the past, a recent history (24 months) of on-time payments carries weight in credit decisions.
  2. Keep credit card balances low. High outstanding debt can pull your score down.
  3. Check your credit report for accuracy. Inaccurate information on your credit report can be cleared up easily. Always contact the original creditor and the credit bureaus whenever you clear up an error so that the inaccurate information won't reappear later
  4. Pay down debt. Consolidating your credit card debt or spreading it over multiple cards will not improve your score in the long run. The most effective way to improve your credit is by slowly paying down the amount you owe.
  5. Use credit cards - but manage them responsibly. In general, having credit cards and installment loans that you pay on time will raise your score. Someone who has no credit card tends to have a lower score than someone who has already proven that he/she can manage credit cards responsibly.
  6. Don't open multiple accounts too quickly, especially if you have a short credit history. This can look risky because you are taking on a lot of possible debt. New accounts will also lower the average age of your existing accounts which is something that also impacts your credit score.
  7. Don't close an account to remove it from your record. A closed account will still show up on your credit report. In fact, closing accounts can sometimes hurt your score unless you also pay down your debt at the same time.
  8. Shop for a loan within a focused period of time. Credit bureaus distinguish between a search for a single loan and a search for many new credit lines, based in part on the length of time over which the credit inquiries were made.
  9. Don't open new credit card accounts you don't need. This approach could backfire and actually lower your score.
  10. Contact your creditors or see a legitimate credit counselor if you're having financial difficulties. This won't raise your score immediately, but the sooner you begin managing your credit well and making timely payments, the sooner your score will improve.

To learn more about credit scores, check out the e-learning course through our partner, Guidewell Financial Solutions. Guidewell counselors are available to help you establish a budget, assist you with getting out of debt, prepare you for the purchase of your first home and more. For more information, visit their website or call 800-642-2227

Guidewell Financial Solutions

Market USA has partnered with Guidewell Financial Solutions (formerly Consumer Credit Counseling Services of MD & DE) to offer you a variety of money management solutions. Guidewell Financial counselors can help you establish a budget, assist you with getting out of debt, prepare you for the purchase of your first home and so much more. They also offer online financial education on a variety of topics including checking accounts, credit cards, student loans, identity theft, credit reports and credit scores.

Serving the community since 1966, Guidewell Financial Solutions is an accredited non-profit financial literacy advocate. They are dedicated to helping individuals and families resolve financial problems through confidential budget counseling, debt management repayment programs, and community education. Annually, Guidewell Financial Solutions help more than 30,000 individuals through counseling sessions and reaches more than 150,000 individuals through education programs.

For more information, visit their website or call 800-642-2227